Xbox One Assassin’s Creed Unity Bundle

If you haven’t buy the Xbox One, here’s something to tempt you further. Microsoft just released the Xbox One Assassin’s Creed Unity Bundle. Yes, Xbox One bundled with the new Assassin’s Creed Unity.

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Available from 18 November, the Xbox One Assassin’s Creed Unity Bundle retails in Singapore at S$739. The bundle includes a Xbox One 500GB console, a wireless controller, a Kinect sensor, Assassin’s Creed Unity and Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag.

And also from now to 31 December, purchase a 12-month Xbox Live Gold membership (S$79.90) with any Xbox One console or bundle in a single receipt and you stand to get up to nine games free, including the much anticipated Halo: The Master Chief Collection. So what are you still waiting for?

Control the music on your Uber ride with Spotify

Spotify and Uber are partnering to let you control the music during your ride. When you request a Uber car, you’ll be able to choose the music you want to hear on the journey. When your ride arrives, your tunes will be playing on the car’s speakers. How cool is that?

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If you are matched with a music-enabled Uber when you request for a ride, the music bar will appear at the bottom of the Uber app. You can choose music from Spotify’s ready-made playlist, your playlists or search for something new. You can even control the music wireless either from the Uber or Spotify app until you arrive your destination.

The new Uber and Spotify integration will be available to all Uber and Spotify Premium users on iOS and Android from 21 November 2014 in 10 cities. The 10 cities include: Singapore, London, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Nashville, New York, San Francisco, Stockholm, Sydney and Toronto. The integration will continue to roll out globally over the coming weeks.

Race the tube in Singapore

Recently there is a online trend to race the tube. Basically you get off the train and run to the next station to catch the same train. The online craze has been done in cities like London, Berlin, Paris, Hong Kong etc etc.

Well, a group of people just did one in Singapore to promote the Asics City Relay event.

OK, its not exactly race the tube since they are doing in a relay format. But still quite impressive. Little India to Farrer Park station is quite a distance.

SIA passenger billed $1200 for inflight Internet

An SIA passenger has been charged US$1,171.46 for using the inflight Internet on a flight from London to Singapore.

Jeremy Gutsche, a Canadian entrepreneur, purchased the 30MB package for US$28.99 but he busted the 30MB limit. He claimed that he used the internet mainly for work emails between naps and just viewed 155 pages.

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His article about his experience has been picked up by several media around the world.

This is not the first time we hear about bill shock although most of the bill shock stories come from data roaming and not inflight internet. But they are mostly the same. User either didn’t sign up for the package or exceed their allocated limits.

SIA offers 2 price plan for their inflight Internet: volume-based at US$9.99 for 10MB and time-base at US$11.95 for 1 hour.

Personally, I think SIA’s price plan is ok. After all, you are accessing Internet at an altitude of 39000 feet. It is unfair to say that SIA is overcharging for their internet.

The problem here lies with the user. Jeremy claims that he only send a 4mb email and view 155 pages. It is unclear what are the file size of the 155 pages. If the file size is small, then I doubt the inflight Internet charge can chalk up to $1200. I guess most likely something is running in the background. Maybe his computer is doing some system update? Or maybe there is a malware in his computer and it is sending data without the owner’s knowledge.

You would assume a CEO of a website would know more about this sort of thing. No use complaining about it after you receive the bill. It is clearly a user error.

Counting the number of pages view is a terrible way to gauge data usage. And you are assuming that’s the only thing that your computer is doing. If you don’t know exactly how much data you will be using, I suggest you subscribe to a time-base package instead.

Apple releases tool to disable iMessage for former iPhone owners

Those who switch away from iPhone often encounter issue with iMessage. iMessage, for the uninitiated, lets iOS 5 and above users communicate with each other over data instead of their telco’s SMS bundle. The system works great until the user decide to leave iOS for another mobile OS. There were reports that some users couldn’t receive message send from another iPhone user after they change their mobile OS.

One of the solution is to turn off iMessage on the old iPhone before switching to the new phone. But some users said even this method does not solve the problem.

I always joke that the best solution to the issue is to go back to using iPhone again. But hey, Apple recently released a tool to help former iPhone owners disable iMessage.

iMessage

The new tool includes step by step instructions for de-registering iMessage for users. Do try it out if you are switching mobile OS and let me know if it works.